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South Sudan

UN Resolution 2057 (5 July 2012) – South Sudan

“9. Calls upon all parties to allow, in accordance with relevant provisions of international law, the full, safe and unhindered access of relief personnel to all those in need and delivery of humanitarian assistance, in particular to internally displaced persons and refugees.”

See also resolution 2109 (2013), resolution 2241 (2015), resolution 2252 (2015), resolution 2290 (2016).

UN Resolution 2155 (27 May 2014) – South Sudan

“Expressing deep concern over the large-scale displacement of persons and deepening humanitarian crisis, stressing the responsibility borne by all parties to the conflict for the suffering of the people of South Sudan, and the necessity of ensuring that the basic needs of the population are met, commending United Nations humanitarian agencies and partners for their efforts to provide urgent and coordinated support to the population, calling upon all parties to the conflict to allow and facilitate, in accordance with relevant provisions of international law and United Nations guiding principles of humanitarian assistance, the full, safe and unhindered access of relief personnel, equipment and supplies to all those in need and timely delivery of humanitarian assistance, in particular to internally displaced persons and refugees, condemning all attacks against humanitarian personnel and facilities and recalling that attacks against humanitarian personnel and depriving civilians of objects indispensable to their survival may amount to violations of international humanitarian law.”

UN resolution 2187 (2014),

“Demands all parties allow, in accordance with relevant provisions of international law and United Nations guiding principles of humanitarian assistance, the full, safe and unhindered access of relief personnel, equipment and supplies, to all those in need and timely delivery of humanitarian assistance, in particular to internally displaced persons and refugees and stresses that any returns of IDPs or refugees must be undertaken on a voluntary and informed basis in conditions of dignity and safety.”

See also resolution 2187 (2014), resolution 2241 (2015), resolution 2252 (2015). resolution 2206 (2015).

UN Resolution 2187 (25 November 2014) – South Sudan

“Expressing deep concern over the large-scale displacement of persons and

deepening humanitarian crisis, (…), calling upon all parties to the conflict to allow and facilitate, in accordance with relevant provisions of international law and United Nations guiding principles of humanitarian assistance, the full, safe and unhindered access of relief personnel, equipment and supplies to all those in need and timely delivery of humanitarian assistance, in particular to internally displaced persons and refugees, condemning all attacks against humanitarian personnel and facilities and recalling that attacks against humanitarian personnel and depriving civilians of objects indispensable to their survival may amount to violations of international humanitarian law.”

See also resolution 2206 (2015), resolution 2290 (2016), resolution 2327 (2016).

UN Resolution 2206 (3 March 2015) – Sanctions, South Sudan

“3. Demands that the parties respect all aspects of the CoH Agreements and immediately implement the necessary modalities in accordance with the 9 May 2014 Agreement and other relevant Agreements, including the progressive withdrawal of foreign forces deployed in South Sudan since 15 December 2013, calls upon all parties to armed conflict in South Sudan to issue clear orders prohibiting all violations of international humanitarian law and human rights violations and abuses, and underscores the necessity for all parties to ensure immediate access to humanitarian agencies and further demands that the parties commit to finding a comprehensive agreement without further delay.”

“7.Underscores that such actions or policies as described in paragraph 6 above may include, but are not limited to: (…)

(f) The obstruction of the activities of international peacekeeping, diplomatic, or humanitarian missions in South Sudan, including IGAD’s Monitoring and Verification Mechanism or of the delivery or distribution of, or access to, humanitarian assistance

(g) Attacks against United Nations missions, international security presences, or other peacekeeping operations, or humanitarian personnel (…).”

UN Resolution 2241 (9 October 2015) – South Sudan

“Further condemning harassment and targeting of civil society, humanitarian personnel and journalists, and emphasizing the importance of accountability for those responsible for violations of international humanitarian law and violations and abuses of human rights and that the Government of South Sudan bears the primary responsibility to protect its populations from crimes against humanity, war crimes, ethnic cleansing, and genocide.”

“Condemning all attacks against humanitarian personnel and facilities, including those that resulted in the deaths of 34 personnel since December 2013, and recalling that attacks against humanitarian personnel and depriving civilians of objects indispensable to their survival may amount to violations of international humanitarian law.”

“22. Recalls the designation criteria detailed in paragraph 7 of resolution 2206 (2015), stresses the sanctity of United Nations protection sites, and specifically underscores that individuals or entities that are responsible or complicit in, or have engaged in, directly or indirectly, attacks against United Nations missions, international security presences, or other peacekeeping operations, or humanitarian personnel, threaten the peace, security and stability of South Sudan and therefore may meet the designation criteria.”

See also resolution 2252 (2015), resolution 2327 (2016), resolution 2206 (2015), resolution 2290 (2016), resolution 2304 (2016), resolution 2406 (2018).

UN Resolution 2290 (31 May 2016) – Sanctions, South Sudan

“Expressing deep concern over the large-scale displacement of persons and deepening humanitarian crisis, noting the finding in the final report of the South Sudan Panel of Experts (S/2016/70), established pursuant to paragraph 18 of resolution 2206 (2015), that obstruction of humanitarian access is widespread and that parts of numerous states of South Sudan are entirely blocked from humanitarian relief, stressing the responsibility borne by all parties to the conflict for the suffering of the people of South Sudan, and in this regard, recognizes that in accordance with the Agreement, the TGNU shall review the Non-Governmental Organizations Bill, and submit the legislation to a process of public consultation to ensure that such legislation is consistent with international best practice and with its commitment to create an enabling political, administrative, operational and legal environment for the delivery of humanitarian assistance and protection.”

“4. Demands that South Sudan’s leaders fully and immediately adhere to the permanent ceasefire in accordance with their obligations under the Agreement, and allow in accordance with relevant provisions of international law and the UN guiding principles of humanitarian assistance, full, safe and unhindered humanitarian access to help ensure timely delivery of humanitarian assistance to all those in need.”

[8.] “Reaffirms that the provisions of paragraph 9 of resolution 2206 (2015) apply to individuals, and that the provisions of paragraph 12 of resolution 2206 (2015) apply to individuals and entities, as designated for such measures by the Committee established pursuant to paragraph 16 of resolution 2206 (2015) (“the Committee”), as responsible for or complicit in, or having engaged in, directly or indirectly, actions or policies that threaten the peace, security or stability of South Sudan.”

“9. Underscores that such actions or policies as described in paragraph 8 above may include, but are not limited to:

(…)

(f) The obstruction of the activities of international peacekeeping, diplomatic, or humanitarian missions in South Sudan, including the Ceasefire and Transitional Security Arrangements Monitoring Mechanism or of the delivery or distribution of, or access to, humanitarian assistance.

(g) Attacks against United Nations missions, international security presences, or other peacekeeping operations, or humanitarian personnel; (…).”

See also resolution 2428 (2018).

UN Resolution 2304 (12 August 2016) – South Sudan

“Condemning in the strongest terms the fighting in Juba, South Sudan 8-11 July 2016, (…), and recalling resolution 2206 (2015), which states in part that those who engage in attacks against United Nations missions, international security presences, or other peacekeeping operations, or humanitarian personnel may be subject to sanctions.”

UN Resolution 2327 (16 December 2016) – South Sudan

“Recalling that individuals or entities responsible for or complicit in, or having engaged in, directly or indirectly, actions or policies that threaten the peace, security or stability of South Sudan, may be designated for targeted sanctions pursuant to resolution 2206 (2015), 2271 (2016), 2280 (2016), and 2290 (2016), including individuals who engage in attacks against United Nations missions, international security presences, or other peacekeeping operations, or humanitarian personnel recalling its willingness to impose targeted sanctions.”

“2. Demands that the TGNU of South Sudan comply with the obligations set out in the SOFA between the Government of South Sudan and the United Nations, and immediately cease obstructing UNMISS in the performance of its mandate, and further demands the TGNU immediately cease obstructing international and national humanitarian actors from assisting civilians, and facilitate freedom of movement for the Ceasefire and Transitional Security Arrangements Monitoring Mechanism (CTSAMM) and calls on the TGNU to take action, to deter, and to hold those responsible to account for any hostile or other actions that impede UNMISS or international and national humanitarian actors.”

“22. Condemns in the strongest terms attacks on and looting of humanitarian aid, including food and medicine, and premises, including hospitals and warehouses, and demands that all parties allow, in accordance with relevant provisions of international law and United Nations guiding principles of emergency humanitarian assistance, including humanity, impartiality, neutrality, and independence, the rapid, safe and unhindered access of relief personnel, equipment and supplies, and timely delivery of humanitarian assistance, to all those in need throughout South Sudan in particular to IDPs and refugees and stresses that any returns or other durable solutions for IDPs or refugees must be undertaken on a voluntary and informed basis in conditions of dignity and safety.”

See also resolution 2406 (2018).

UN Resolution 2406 (15 March 2018) – Targeted sanctions, South Sudan

“Recognizing the dire humanitarian situation and high levels of food insecurity in many parts of the country, and in this regard noting the importance of UNMISS’s contribution to creating through coordination with humanitarian actors, displaced communities, and authorities the conditions for the safe, voluntary, and dignified return of IDPs and refugees, so that they may resume their livelihoods including the cultivation of land for food production.”

“Expressing serious and urgent concern over the more than four million displaced persons and deepening humanitarian crisis, including an estimated 5.3 million that face severe food insecurity according to the January 2018 Integrated Food Security Phase Classification report, which reflects a 40 percent increase from January 2017, and seven million in need of life-saving assistance, and that half of the country’s children are out of school, stressing the responsibility borne by all parties to the conflict for the immense suffering of the people of South Sudan, including the destruction or damage to livelihoods and productive assets, commending United Nations humanitarian agencies, partners, and donors for their efforts to provide urgent and coordinated support to the population, and calling upon the international community to continue these efforts to meet the growing humanitarian needs of the people of South Sudan.”

“Condemning the obstructions by all parties to civilians’ movement and to humanitarian actors’ movement to reach civilians in need of assistance, expressing concern at the increasing ad hoc legislation, new taxes, and permits which are hampering the delivery of humanitarian assistance across the country, and recalling the need for all parties to the conflict to allow and facilitate, in accordance with relevant provisions of international law and United Nations guiding principles of humanitarian assistance, including humanity, impartiality, neutrality, and independence, the full, safe and unhindered access of relief personnel, equipment and supplies and timely delivery of humanitarian assistance, to all those in need, in particular to internally displaced persons (IDPs), and refugees.”

“Condemning all attacks against humanitarian personnel and facilities that resulted in the deaths of at least 98 personnel since December 2013 including the attack on the Terrain compound on 11 July 2016 and attacks against medical personnel and hospitals, noting with alarm the increasing trend of harassment and intimidation of humanitarian personnel, an recalling that attacks against humanitarian personnel and objects indispensable the survival of the civilian population may amount to violations of international humanitarian law.”

“Determining that the situation in South Sudan continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security in the region.”

“23. Condemns in the strongest terms attacks on and looting of humanitarian aid, including food and medicine, and premises, including hospitals and medical facilities and warehouses, and demands that all parties allow, in accordance with relevant provisions of international law and United Nations guiding principles of emergency humanitarian assistance, including humanity, impartiality, neutrality, and independence, the rapid, safe and unhindered access of relief personnel, equipment and supplies, and timely delivery of humanitarian assistance, to all those in need throughout South Sudan in particular to IDPs and refugees, stresses the obligation to respect and protect all medical personnel and humanitarian personnel exclusively engaged in medical duties, their means of transport and equipment, as well as hospitals and other medical facilities, stresses also that any returns or other durable solutions for IDPs or refugees must be undertaken on a voluntary and informed basis in conditions of dignity and safety, and notes that freedom of movement of civilians and their right to seek asylum should be respected.”

See also resolution 2241 (2015), resolution 2252 (2015), resolution 2290 (2016).