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COMMEMORATING STARVATION IN THE 21st CENTURY
Famine memorials have, up to now, focused on starvation as an outcome or an experience. A memorial that tried to evoke starvation as a criminal act that people do to one another would not just relate to the victims, but also to the perpetrators, their accomplices, and bystanders. This is a necessary...
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FOOD AND POWER IN SUDAN: A CRITIQUE OF HUMANITARISM
The Sudan government is using aid in the pursuit of a far-reaching strategy of social and political transformation, creating displacement and hunger—with the ready connivance of the UN and NGOs. Effective famine prevention in Sudan means challenging the charitable and technocratic approaches, and in...
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FAMINE AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Famine is a violation of human rights and is preventable. While humanitarian aid focuses on treating the symptoms of famine, governments should instead be required to cease perpetuating the abuses which are creating and perpetuating the famine. Requiring governments to respect human and material rig...
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STARVING OUT THE SOUTH IN CIVIL WAR
This is a detailed account of the 1985-89 period of conflict in southern Sudan and the Sudanese government’s use of famine as a weapon of war. The Sudan government regularly blocked food from reaching civilians and diverted food aid to its army. The liberal political institutions in Sudan at the tim...
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DANGEROUS PRECEDENTS: FAMINE RELIEF IN SOMALIA, 1991-93
Operation Restore Hope, the US-led effort to allow for the delivery of humanitarian supplies in Somalia from 1992-93, was a failure because it failed to account for or address human rights concerns. Failure to consider human rights in famine relief creates the conditions for the perpetuation and rep...
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SUDAN: DENYING THE HONOR OF LIVING
Al Bashir and the Sudanese government have been indiscriminately brutal in their conduct of the war in southern Sudan. The famine of 1986-89 was primarily caused by deliberate policies adopted by the SPLA and the Sudanese government. The Reagan and Bush administrations reacted with indifference to t...
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EVIL DAYS: THIRTY YEARS OF WAR AND FAMINE IN ETHIOPIA
From 1961 to 1991, the Ethiopian government consistently carried out a campaign of indiscriminate violence towards civilians and pursued a counter-insurgency strategy in the 1980s that was the primary cause of the great famine of 1983-85. The famine was not caused by war and drought, but by particul...
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MOVEMENT TOWARDS ACCOUNTABILITY FOR STARVATION
In this briefing paper, the World Peace Foundation and Global Rights Compliance review two key advances that occurred in 2018 in relation to accountability for mass starvation, and indicate areas where more work is required.
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Famine that Kills: Darfur, Sudan
In 2004, Darfur, Sudan was described as the "world's greatest humanitarian crisis." Twenty years previously, Darfur was also the site of a disastrous famine. Famine that Kills is a seminal account of that famine, and a social history of the region. In a new preface prepared for this revised edition,...
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ENDING STARVATION CRIMES
As 2019 begins and the number of victims of starvation spirals into the millions, we must urgently address how we can strengthen our collective response to deter such conduct. Global Rights Compliance Wayne Jordash QC and Catriona Murdoch talk with the Diplomat Magazine about present accountability ...
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2015 Global Hunger Index: Armed Conflict and the Challenge of Hunger
The level of hunger in developing countries as a group has fallen by 27 percent since 2000. While the world has made progress in reducing hunger in recent decades, the state of hunger is still serious or alarming in 52 countries. These findings come from the 2015 Global Hunger Index (GHI) report,...
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ARCS OF GLOBAL JUSTICE:
The essays are written by luminary scholars and jurists from Africa, Asia, Europe and the USA, and are coedited by Margaret M. de Guzman and Diane Marie Amann. They examine contemporary, historical, cultural, and theoretical aspects of the many arcs of global justice in which Professor Schabas has w...
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ASSESSING THE ANTI-ATROCITY TOOLBOX
The international failure to prevent and mitigate mass violence against civilians in the post-Cold War era, notably in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Rwanda, sparked a series of stock-taking efforts within international organisations, national governments and the broader policy community.
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DEFENSE PERSPECTIVES ON INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE
The newly published book 'Defense Perspectives on International Criminal Justice' examines the role of the defense in international criminal proceedings, providing an assessment of the current challenges to the guarantee of fair and efficient criminal proceedings. It is an accumulation of discussion...
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Ending Mass Atrocity and Ending Famine
On Sept 29, 2015, world leaders at the United Nations General Assembly adopted Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2—“end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture ending world hunger by 2030”. Meeting this goal is likely to be a complex and difficult u...
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FAMINE CRIMES: POLITICS AND THE DISASTER RELIEF INDUSTRY IN AFRICA
Famine is preventable. The persistence of famine reflects political failings by African governments, western donors and international relief agencies. Can Africa avoid famine? When freedom from famine is a basic right or a political imperative, famine is prevented. Case studies from Ethiopia to Bots...
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How Mass Atrocities End
Given the brutality of mass atrocities, it is no wonder that one question dominates research and policy: what can we, who are not at risk, do to prevent such violence and hasten endings? But this question skips a more fundamental question for understanding the trajectory of violence: how do mass atr...
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IS INTENTIONAL STARVATION THE FUTURE OF WAR?
Alex de Waal of the World Peace Foundation, GRC's Managing Partner Wayne Jordash and GRC's Senior Legal Consultant Catriona Murdoch were recently interviewed for the New Yorker article 'Is International Starvation the Future of War?'.
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Is the Era of Great Famines Over?
The worst drought in three decades has left almost 20 million Ethiopians — one-fifth of the population — desperately short of food. And yet the country’s mortality rate isn’t expected to increase: In other words, Ethiopians aren’t starving to death.
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JUDICIAL CREATIVITY AT THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL TRIBUNALS
This chapter highlights the evolution of the ad hoc Tribunals' approach to the specificity of indictments. This is an issue at the very heart of the fairness of international criminal justice and reveals important aspects of the ad hoc Tribunals' commitment to issues pertaining to the fundamental ri...
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Mass Starvation: The History and Future of Famine
The world almost conquered famine. Until the 1980s, this scourge killed ten million people every decade, but by early 2000s mass starvation had all but disappeared. Today, famines are resurgent, driven by war, blockade, hostility to humanitarian principles and a volatile global economy. In Mass S...
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PLURALISM IN INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW
Edited by Elies van Sliedregt and Sergey Vasiliev Innovative study of the impact of divergent judgments in international criminal law, assessing whether they undermine the legitimacy, coherence, and efficiency of international criminal justice Identifies areas of law in need of harmonization a...
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Reconstructing Atrocity Prevention
In the two and a half decades since the end of the Cold War, policy makers have become acutely aware of the extent to which the world today faces mass atrocities. In an effort to prevent the death, destruction, and global chaos wrought by these crimes, the agendas for both national and international...
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ROHINGYA: WHY THE ICC WAS RIGHT AND WHAT IT MUST DO
GRC's Managing Partner Wayne Jordash wrote for the JusticeInfo.net about the Rohingya's repatriation, their need for justice for the atrocities committed by Myanmar and the role of the International Criminal Court. 'Wayne Jordash is one of the most experienced lawyers before international crimina...
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The Nazis Used It; We Use It: The return of starvation as a weapon of war
In its primary use, the verb ‘to starve’ is transitive: it’s something people do to one another, like torture or murder. Mass starvation as a consequence of the weather has very nearly disappeared: today’s famines are all caused by political decisions, yet journalists still use the phrase ‘man-made ...
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The Real Politics of the Horn of Africa: Money, War and the Business of Power
The Real Politics of the Horn of Africa delves into the business of politics in the turbulent, war-torn countries of north-east Africa. It is a contemporary history of how politicians, generals and insurgents bargain over money and power, and use of war to achieve their goals. Drawing on a thirty...
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What Counts at the End? Questioning Consensus in the Construction of Mass Atrocity Narratives
Civilian fatality figures are a limited, if important, data point that influences the ability of researchers to study patterns of violence and evaluate policy responses intended to end violence. However, across datasets that track such violence there are significant differences in how and what is co...
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WILL SEVEN MILLION STARVING YEMENIS EVER FIND JUSTICE?
Catriona Murdoch and Wayne Jordash discuss whether the control of food imports into Yemen are being used as a weapon of war, seemingly by all sides.
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